The Irish Free State/26-Counties 1922-1937

Cultural Center of Cape Cod, South Yarmouth
Wednesdays May 15, 22 and June 5, 12   6:00 to 7:00 
Post Irish Civil War panel

The Irish Free State (Saorstát Éireann: 6 December 1922 – 29 December 1937) was a state established in 1922 under the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 1921 that ended the three-year Irish War of Independence.

The Irish Free State (Saorstát Éireann:  6 December 1922 – 29 December 1937) was a state established in 1922 under the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 1921 that ended the three-year Irish War of Independence.The Free State was established as a Dominion of the British Commonwealth of Nations. It comprised 26 of the 32 counties of Ireland. Northern Ireland, which comprised the remaining six counties, exercised its right under the Treaty to opt out of the new state.Pro-Treaty members, who formed Cumann na nGaedheal in 1923, held an effective majority in the Dáil from 1922 to 1927, and ruled as a minority government until 1932.

In 1931, with the passage of the Statute of Westminster, the Parliament of the United Kingdom relinquished its remaining authority to legislate for the Free State and other dominions. This had the effect of making the dominions fully sovereign states. The Free State became the first internationally recognized independent Irish state.In 1926 Sinn Féin president,  deValera, resigned from Sinn Féin and founded Fianna Fáil.  Fianna Fáil entered the Dáil following the 1927 general election, and entered government after the Irish general election in 1932, when it became the largest party.

De Valera abolished the Oath of Allegiance and embarked on an economic war with the UK. His new constitution was passed by a referendum in July of 1937.

All students will receive a PowerPoint presentation for each class.


 Cultural Center of Cape Cod, South Yarmouth

Wednesdays May 15, 22 and June 5, 12:  6pm to 7pm
Call 508-394-7100 or go online at http://www.cultural-center.org        $75/$70  for members.          


 

1916 Easter Rebellion in Ireland

On the 21st January 1919 elected members of Dail Eireann met for the first time. In December 1918, 69 Sinn Fein candidates, 26 Unionists and 6 Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP) candidates were elected to represent the people of Ireland.

1916 rebellion painting

The course provides a comprehensive account of the background to the Rising, the Rising itself, and its immediate aftermath. The course provides a comprehensive account of the background to the Rising, the Rising itself, and its immediate aftermath. 

The course will include some audio visual materials. All students will receive a PowerPoint presentation.


 Cultural Center of Cape Cod, South Yarmouth

Wednesdays May 15, 22 and June 5, 12: 7:15 to 8:15
Call 508-394-7100 or go online at http://www.cultural-center.org        $75/$70  for members.          

 

Ireland: Land of Saints and Scholars

Cultural Center of Cape Cod, South Yarmouth
Wednesdays 6 - 7pm, April 3, 10, 27, 24

Book of KellsFrom the 5th to the 9th century Ireland was a place of intense religious, artistic, philosophical and cultural activity.

Saint Patrick’s time coincided with the fall of the Roman Empire, when the "Dark Ages" descended on Europe. People lived under constant threat from war and invasion. Ireland’s geographical location made her relatively safe. Christian refugees and asylum seekers arrived in their thousands from all over Europe.

Many scholars and craftsmen were among those arriving and they brought with them their books and skills. Early Irish monasteries became "universities" and developed into "cities". They hand-copied the Bible and other ancient writings. Without them, much of ancient learning would have been lost. Ireland became known as the land of saints and scholars.

The most famous work from this period is the Book of Kells.

The course will examine this period in detail and cover the lives of Saint Brigid, Saint Kevin, Saint Columbcille, Saint Columbanus and Saint Brendan.

The growth of the "Celtic Church" and its relationship with Rome will be analyzed.

This period came to an end with the arrival of the Vikings who destroyed the monastic settlements and their contents, and killed and enslaved many who lived there.

All students will receive a PowerPoint presentation for each class.


 Cultural Center of Cape Cod, South Yarmouth

Wednesdays 6 - 7pm, April 3, 10, 27, 24
Call 508-394-7100 or go online at http://www.cultural-center.org        $75/$70  for members.          


 

Irish History: Civil War in Ireland 1922-23

Cultural Center of Cape Cod, South Yarmouth
Wednesdays April 3, 10, 17, 24 7:15 to 8:15
Collins Griffith Devalera

The split over the Anglo-Irish Treaty led to the Irish Civil War (1922–23). In 1922, its two main Irish signatories, Arthur Griffith and Michael Collins, both died.  Collins was killed by anti-treaty republicans in an ambush at Béal na Bláth in August 1922, ten days after Griffith's death from heart failure which was ascribed to exhaustion. 

The Irish Civil War broke out with the "Battle of Dublin" in which Cathal Brugha was killed. The anti-Treaty forces initially outnumbered the Free State Army which was concentrated in then "Munster Republic". Within a few months the Free State Army had taken all the strategic sites in Ireland and this was then followed by a period of guerilla warfare.

Following the deaths of Collins and Griffith the Free State introduced draconian measures that led to the execution of more leaders of the Republican movement than by  the British from  1916-1921. At least 13,000 Republicans were incarcerated by the Free State. Erskine Childers was executed for possession of a revolver that Michael Collins had presented him with.

Following the killing of a member of the pro-Treaty Dail the Free State executed four leaders of the anti-Treaty forces that had been in prison since the outbreak of the war - Liam Mellows, Rory O'Connor, Joseph McKelvey and Richard Barrett.

In April 1923, Liam Lynch was killed. This was the “effective end” of the Civil War. His successor as anti-Treaty commander, Frank Aiken, called a ceasefire on 30 April and a month later, May 24, ordered his men to "dump arms" and go home.

All students will receive a PowerPoint presentation for each class.


 Cultural Center of Cape Cod, South Yarmouth

Wednesdays April 3, 10, 17, 24 7:15 to 8:15
Call 508-394-7100 or go online at http://www.cultural-center.org        $75/$70  for members.          


 

The First Dáil 1919 (An Chéad Dáil)

First Centenary Celebration - Song, Video, and Talk
Presentation by Sean Murphy

On the 21st January 1919 elected members of Dail Eireann met for the first time. In December 1918, 69 Sinn Fein candidates, 26 Unionists and 6 Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP) candidates were elected to represent the people of Ireland.

First Dail

Sinn Fein campaigned on abstaining from the British Parliament in London and instead to set up an assembly in Dublin - Dail Eireann.

Only 27 of the Sinn Fein elected members were listed as present at the first meeting. 34 were listed as being "imprisoned by the foreigners", 3 as being "deported by the foreigners" and 5 were listed as "absent". The 26 Unionists and 6 members of the IPP were marked "absent". Two Sinn Fein members, Michael Collins and Harry Boland, were marked present but were in fact in England organizing the escape from prison of Eamon DeValera.

The Declaration of Independence asserted that the Dáil was the parliament of a sovereign state called the "Irish Republic". The Dáil established a cabinet called the "Aireacht", and an elected president. The first, temporary president was Cathal Brugha. He was succeeded as president, in April, by Éamon de Valera.


at SONS OF ERIN
Monday January 21st 7:00 to 9:30

Songs by Dave Hickey, Sean Brennan, Johnny O'Sullivan and others TBC.
Videos and Talk by Sean Murphy

No cover charge. All participants donated their time to the event.


 Cultural Center of Cape Cod, South Yarmouth

Wednesdays January 23rd and 30th from 6 - 7:30pm.
Call 508-394-7100 or go online at http://www.cultural-center.org        $50/$45  for members.          

 

The Rise of Sinn Fein and Irish War of Independence

Irish History Class 
A four week course on the Easter Rising of 1916 will be presented
at the Cultural Center of Cape Cod in South Yarmouth.
Wednesdays Nov 7, 14, 28, and Dec 5:  7:15 to 8:15

The Rebellion in 1916 drew attention to the long history of British injustice in Ireland. The executions following the  Rebellion changed the political situation in Ireland forever. The Rebellion in 1916 drew attention to the long history of British injustice in Ireland. The executions following the  Rebellion changed the political situation in Ireland forever. 

thomas ashesinn feinnow is the time

The death of Thomas Ashe on hunger strike and the attempted conscription of Irish people were two of the main events post 1916. The Home Rule party became discredited. Sinn Fein then became the organization for those who wanted a free and independent Ireland.

The landslide election victory by Sinn Fein in December 1918 led to the formation in 1919 of the first Dail Eireann which approved a provisional constitution for an Irish Republic. The British refused to recognize the Irish Republic, took action against it, and the War of Independence began.

The failure of the post-war Conference to hear Irelands case, the suppression of Sinn Fein, the introduction of the Black and Tans and the Auxiliaries by the British, escalated the war that lasted till July 1921.

All students will receive a PowerPoint presentation for each class.


Cultural Center of Cape Cod 
Wednesdays November 7, 14, 28, and Dec 5: 7:15 to 8:15
Call 508-394-7100 to reserve a place 
http://www.cultural-center.org/product-category/education/humanities
One course: $75/$70 for members.